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Living with Autism: What You Need to Know about Stimming

A Guest Post by Laura Watson


Many people believe that living with autism is as much of a struggle as it is a blessing. Children who live with autism might act differently than other children and they may need to do certain things in order to feel safe and happy.
Stimming (self-stimulatory behavior) is one way that some people experience sensory overload or distress. Examples of stimming include hand flapping, spinning, jumping, and making noises. These behaviors help the person cope with the overstimulation they are experiencing. In this blog post, we’ll talk about what stimming is, why it happens, and how parents can help their child manage stimming in their everyday life.

What Is Stimming?

Stimming is a term used to describe self-stimulatory behavior. It’s basically any repetitive physical activity that increases the person’s sense of self-control and relief from sensory overload or distress. These behaviors are often repetitive, like hand flapping, spinning, hopping, and making noises.

Why Does My Child Need To Stim?

Imagine being overwhelmed with noise, lights, or other sensory input. You might feel stressed and upset. The same is true for children with autism. In some cases, the child may have a sensory processing disorder that can make their senses overstimulated at times. This is why stimming is so important to those who live with autism.

Stimming helps relieve these feelings of overwhelming stress and distress by giving the person an outlet to release energy in a healthy way. It also provides an emotional sense of security for many people with autism.

One study found that 87% of people with autism stimmed at least 10 times per day while 30% stimmed more than 100 times per day. That’s because it’s such an effective tool for managing over-stimulation and keeping things organized in their mind. For those who don’t experience this type of sensory overload, it can be hard to imagine how tempting it would be to stim when you’re feeling overstimulated or anxious.

Parents might worry about their child stimming too much or not enough – but there is no “right amount” when it comes to stimming as every person and situation is different just like inguinal hernia.

How Can I Help My Child Cope with Stimming?

Stimming is a way for children to cope with the overstimulation they may be experiencing. In order to help your child learn how to manage stimming, it’s important to first understand why it happens and what your child needs.

Many people believe that living with autism is as much of a struggle as it is a blessing. Children who live with autism might act differently than other children and they may need to do certain things in order to feel safe and happy. Stimming (self-stimulatory behavior) is one way that some people experience sensory overload or distress. Examples of stimming include hand flapping, spinning, jumping, and making noises. These behaviors help the person cope with the overstimulation they are experiencing.

One way you can help your child manage stimmingis by teaching them coping skills so they can calm down when they feel like they’re overloaded. You can teach them deep breathing exercises, take them on walks outside, or introduce them to calming music. There are also many resources online that provide ideas for coping skills you can teach your child at home.

Conclusion

If your child is struggling with autism and stimming, you are not alone!

The statistics are staggering – nearly 1 in 68 American children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. If your child is one of those children, you’re probably wondering what you can do to help them cope. And the truth is, there are no easy answers.

One of the most critical things you can do is help your child find coping mechanisms that work for them. This is especially true of children with ASD who might rely on stimming as a means of self-soothing and emotional regulation.

Luckily, there are many things you can do to help your child find the right coping mechanisms. This article has touched on a few of those things, but this list is in no way exhaustive. What you want to do is spend time figuring out what works best for your child, and then support them in implementing this into their daily l

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